Covid-19 Panel

Find further details of each talk in the Book of Abstracts here.

Those marked with are eligible for nomination to a student researcher award. Find the full list of awards here.

You are welcome to use the comment function at the bottom of the page to comment on papers you have seen and/or submit questions that you would like to see raised in the discussion panel. If replying to an individual paper, please specify who you are talking to.

Panel chaired by Elena Semino (@elenasemino).

A Corpus-based Analysis of Frames and Metaphors in the Media Reports of COVID-19 ★

Shuyi Amelia SunThe University of Queensland, Australia

shuyi.amelia.sun@uq.net.au
https://www.researchgate.net/profile/Shuyi_Sun4

[short paper]

A Corpus-based Comparative Research on Covid19 News Discourse Representation in Voice of America and China Daily

Yuying HuGuangdong University of Foreign Studies

200511444@oamail.gdufs.edu.cn
https://www.gdufs.edu.cn/

[short paper]

[withdrawn]

Address term and of stance-taking in the discussion of Wuhan Diary in Weibo ★

Yingnian Tao Lancaster University

y.tao4@lancaster.ac.uk
@Daphne68947756
https://www.researchgate.net/profile/Yingnian_Tao2

[short paper]

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Coronavirus in Translated Media Discourse

Dr. Fahad OtaifKing Khalid University
Dr. Waleed AlsubhiJeddah University

Otaiff@kku.edu.sa
@Otaiff

woalsubhi@uj.edu.sa
@WaleedALSubhi‬

[short paper]

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Corpus-Based Critical Discourse Analysis of the Covid-19 Pandemic Discourse in the World Health Organization Director-General’s Speeches

Baramee Kheovichai Silpakorn University

kiao_ra@yahoo.com
http://www.arts.su.ac.th/คณาจารย์ภาควิชาภาษาอังกฤษ/บารมี-เขียววิชัย

[short paper]

Covid-19 and social media: a diachronic discourse analysis for the modeling of linguistic patterns during crises

Louise-Amélie CougnonUniversité catholique de Louvain
Louis de VironDatatext

louise-amelie.cougnon@uclouvain.be
@Amelaaay
https://uclouvain.be/en/research-institutes/ilc/miil

louis@datatext.eu
@devironl
https://www.datatext.eu/

[short paper]

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COVID-19 memorials

Mark McGlashanBirmingham City University

Mark.McGlashan@bcu.ac.uk
@Mark_McGlashan
http://www.MarkMcGlashan.org

[short paper]

COVID-19 pandemic in Polish social media: a mixed methods approach to analysis of collective emotions in digital communication

Maja Sawicka & Agnieszka KarlińskaUniversity of Warsaw

[short paper]

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Exploring the relationship between COVID-19-related sinophobia and representations of Chinese food culture in the UK press

Ursula Kania University of Liverpool

ursula.kania@liverpool.ac.uk
@instantlinguist
https://www.liverpool.ac.uk/english/staff/ursula-kania/

[short paper]

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Intermarium goes viral: a corpus-driven approach to Twitter-based political communication on COVID-19 pandemic of Austrian, Croatian, Polish, and Serbian political leaders ★

Piotr MirochaJagiellonian University, Cracow

[short paper]

Metaphor Use and Efficacy of Science Communication [planned multidisciplinary project]

Saskia Kersten, Alana Jelinek & Naomi Forrester-SotoUniversity of Hertfordshire / Keele University

s.kersten@herts.ac.uk
@Saskia_Kersten

[short paper]

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Military frames for the pandemic in Central and Eastern Europe: A corpus-linguistic perspective on figurative battles, historical battles, and the rhetorical potential of WAR

Ksenija Bogetić University of Belgrade, Serbia / Research Centre of the Slovenian Academy of Sciences and Arts, Slovenia

ksenija.bogetic@zrc-sazu.si
@ksenijabogetic

[short paper]

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Pandemics and metaphor: A historical perspective

Charlotte TaylorUniversity of Sussex

@_ctaylor_
https://profiles.sussex.ac.uk/p329327-charlotte-taylor/grants

[short paper]

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Risk communication and covid-19: affect and nationalist/xenophobic discourse

Katherine Russo Università degli Studi di Napoli “L’Orientale”

[short paper]

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Social media discourse and conspiracy theories during the COVID-19 pandemic ★

Natalie Dykes & Stefan Evert FAU Erlangen-Nürnberg

[short paper]

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The balance between reassuring and scaring: the discourse of government health advisers and politicians during the pandemic in the UK

Roberta Piazza & Ivor GaberUniversity of Sussex

[short paper]

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The Development of COVID-19 Word List from the Perspective of Emergency Language Services ★

Longxing LiUniversity of Macau

[short paper]

[withdrawn]

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The good and the bad of Italian pandemic pedagogy: a corpus-driven analysis of the representation of Covid-19 emergency online teaching in the newly developing discourse of the Italian media

Giovanna Carloni L’Università di Urbino Carlo Bo

[short paper]

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‘The more we restrict contact, the more we slow the spread of infection’: Ambiguity, responsibility and political action in the UK coronavirus briefings

Jamie Williams & David Wright Nottingham Trent University

Jamie.Williams@ntu.ac.uk
@jamie_wil52

[short paper]

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Wake Up It’s a #Plandemic: Covid-19 and Conspiracy Clique Communities on Twitter

Dr. Joseph FlanaganUniversity of Helsinki

[short paper]

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Weaponising coronavirus online

Nicole BaumgartenUniversity of Sheffield

[short paper]

21 thoughts on “Covid-19 Panel

  1. Amelie Cougnon June 16, 2020 — 3:22 pm

    Thank you @Shuyi Amelia Sun for your presentation. I would be very glad to know more about the metaphor identification procedure and the cross-cultural differences you found. Louise-Amélie

    Like

  2. Amelie Cougnon June 16, 2020 — 3:28 pm

    Than you @Yingnian Tao for your talk. I would be interested in the constructed dialogue strategy you mentionned. Can you tell us a little more about it?

    Like

    1. Hi Amelie, thank you very much for your question. Constructed dialogue in this case refers to that the internet users make up a dialogue between Zhang and Fang, such as Fang: Who do you think you are? Do you contribute anything to this anti-virus campaign? Zhang: I am the Academician of the Academic of Engineering, the advisor of Jiangxia Capsule Hospital. I have worked in the frontline in Wuhan for 82 days. The users’ stance taking is made salient in the constructed dialogue.

      Like

  3. Amelie Cougnon June 16, 2020 — 3:31 pm

    Thank you @Shuyi Amelia Sun for introducing the interesting MIP procedure. Could you detail somehow your conclusions about the cross-cultural differences you noticed?

    Like

  4. Amelie Cougnon June 16, 2020 — 3:41 pm

    Thank you @Baramee Kheovichai for your very clear presentation. I would be interested to know more about your BE06 reference (exclusion) list, as I am myself using reference corpora.

    Like

    1. Thank you very much for your comment and question. I use BE06 wordlist as a reference because I would like to compare the speeches with a wordlist that is up-to-date. The BE06 is a corpus that has the same design as LOB and FLOB so it is a general corpus representing 15 online written genres published between 2005-2008 (http://www.helsinki.fi/varieng/CoRD/corpora/BE06/). So it’s quite recent and that’s why I decide it to use it as a reference corpus. I hope that answers your question but if not feel free to contact me. Or if you have any suggestion, it will be deeply appreciated.

      Like

  5. Thank you @Otaiff and @WaleedALSubhi‬ for your insightful take on the topic of Corona and particularly in Arabic Corpora. I would highly appreciate more details on the analyses of concordances for any trends of discourse if applicable and explications concerning potential limitations or challenges with inflections in Arabic corpora. Thanks in advance!

    Like

  6. Stefania Maria Maci June 16, 2020 — 8:50 pm

    Thank you for all your presentations. They are all intriguing and food for thought. I enjoyed Charlotte’s analysis about the various pandemics and all the other colleagues’ investigation about the way in which Covid-19 is metaphorically dealt with. Unfortunately I cannot be with you tomorrow, as I am having exams, so I am asking my questions now. They are more comments than questions. One for Mark Glashan (Hi Mark!). Thank you for your presentation. I enjoyed it and I appreciated your idea of developing a ‘grammar of grief’. When you analyse 3/4 n-grams, you say that deontic modality is used and you give some examples with ‘will be’. To me, these expressions seem an indication of certainty and may reveal epistemicity rather than deonticity.
    The other comment is for Roberta Piazza. Thank you Roberta for your extremely interesting presentation. I liked how you pointed out the way in which the idea that success against covid can be grounded in solidarity has been constructed. However, the PM also sad that “You must stay at home to protect NHS” (as reported by in one of their slides by Jamie Williams & David Wright). I think that much of the PM discourse or narrative has been constructed more on the necessity of ‘being together to protect’ NHS rather than to ‘defeat’ covid and save one own’s life. On a similar cline, in Italy there has been a shift from health to other political issues: the narrative around/against covid has been constructed on the sense of people’s responsibility (to ‘protect’ the Italian NHS): being safe/ill was a matter of responsible behaviour rather than a health issue. I am just thinking aloud and it would be nice to discuss about that also in a cross-cultural perspective.
    Thank you ALL.
    Best wishes,
    Sefania

    Like

  7. @Mark_McGlashan Thank you very much for your thought-provoking presentation. I was wondering if this project will also investigate whether COVID-19 memorials are similar to or different from other obituaries.

    Like

  8. Thank you everyone for your questions and comments – looking forward to this afternoon

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  9. @Nicole Baumgarten : very interesting research! I would be glad to talk to you about our own research on Twitter, as we are also working on a non-English language (French), and attitudes towards politicians often include hatred. Amélie

    Like

    1. Thanks Amelie – I thought so too! l’ll catch up with you on email asap, especially regarding the “grey zone” (unfortunately, my broadband is having issues… :(( ). This is the bigger project that the COVID one is part of https://www.researchgate.net/project/XPEROHS-Towards-balance-and-boundaries-in-public-discourse-expressing-and-perceiving-online-hate-speech

      Like

  10. Amélie Cougnon June 17, 2020 — 3:04 pm

    @Saskia Kersten: Your research is really interesting and original. Could you tell us a little more about the role of this artist in this project?

    Like

  11. Amélie Cougnon June 17, 2020 — 3:12 pm

    Thank you @Charlotte Taylor, your presentation was so clear! I also very much enjoyed the “recycling of discourse” approach. I will certainly look at that in my own research!

    Like

  12. Amélie Cougnon June 17, 2020 — 3:44 pm

    @Natalie Dykes I would be delighted to talk to you as our researches are similar in numerous ways. We could perhaps compare our results between Belgium and Germany?

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  13. @Ursula Kania I am very interested in this topic and appreciate your work. I am interested to know, in what way have COVID-19-related representations of Chinese food culture in the UK press influenced readers’ attitudes/opinion towards Chinese food culture? Is it possible to investigate this topic, perhaps by analysing the comments under these news articles? I am looking forward to your response, Thank you! Ding

    Like

    1. Hello Ding – thanks for your comment/question! I know I’ve answered this during the panel discussion but posting here again in case it’s of interest to people coming across the page just now – I would like to/will probably look at comments soon. One of the Daily Mail articles covering the ‘bat soup video’ had over 1000 comments, so I think this will be a rich resource for tapping into readers’ attitudes! But like I’ve also pointed out during the panel, a lot of the comments are very negative/openly racist, so this is something to be mindful of when tackling such an interesting but also potentially distressing dataset!

      Like

  14. Thank you Nicole Baumgarten for sharing this great talk. I am particularly interested in the “linguistics and rhetorical innovation and creative language use”. Could you possibly explain a bit more about what kind of innovative use and/or how do you identify it? In my dataset of the online comments expressing criticism, users present innovative address terms. Thank you.

    Like

  15. Thank you Ursula for this interesting research. I haven’t got a time to ask a question in the panel meeting so I posted here. I wonder if there is a change of stereotypes about the Chinese food culture in the uk press over time during different phases of the pandemic? I assume that the middle March might be a watershed in terms of the severity of the situation in China and the rest of the world, esp. Europe. Does the stereotype mitigate, strengthen or simply remain? Thank you.

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    1. Dear Yingnian, thanks for your question, and sorry for not replying sooner! Unfortunately, I have not yet had the time to explore data beyond January 2020, so at this point my answer is merely speculative, but I do think that there have been changes in the coverage and hence also the reproduction/challenging of harmful stereotypes (for example, I do know that some regional newspapers have explicitly addressed the situation with regard to negative impacts on local Chinese restaurants/a rise in hate crimes against the Chinese community, etc.). I hope I’ll be able to devote more time to this project within the next couple of months, so hopefully I’ll have a better answer soon!

      Like

  16. Very interesting series of talks with lively, thought-provoking discussion. For the many presenters (and others) interested in metaphor: Now we are focused on COVID-19 as the target, looking at the various fields that are drawn upon when talking about the pandemic (e.g. the prominent war/enemy metaphors, or other fields used to describe other pandemics in past as reviewed by @_ctaylor_). But as life moves on, given the prominent spot this coronavirus crisis will have in world history, can we expect the COVID-19 pandemic itself to become a field for the creation of metaphors used in reference to other targets of discourse (presumably conflicts, obstacles, etc.)? Or similarly, at least the field of virology (more broadly speaking) to be drawn upon more heavily or frequently for metaphorical references? I say “as life moves on,” but I think we can already start seeing examples where COVID (and related phenomena) becomes a metaphor for other problems.

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