Extremist Discourse

Find further details of each talk in the Book of Abstracts here.

Those marked with are eligible for nomination to a student researcher award. Find the full list of awards here.

You are welcome to use the comment function at the bottom of the page to comment on papers you have seen and/or submit questions that you would like to see raised in the discussion panel. If replying to an individual paper, please specify who you are talking to.

Panel chaired by Veronika Koller (@VeronikaKoller).

Evaluation and ideology in the representation of anarchists in two comparable corpora of Greek and English journalistic texts

Georgia FragakiUniversity of Peloponnese

g.fragkaki@uop.gr
http://phil.uop.gr/index.php/en/people

[long paper]

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Investigating activism on Twitter

Angela ZottolaAston University
Andressa Rodrigues GomideLancaster University

angela.zottola@unito.it
@angela_zottola

a.rodriguesgomide@lancaster.ac.uk
@gomidear

[long paper]

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The use of jihad in Extreme, Fringe and Moderate discourse

Paul Baker Lancaster University

p.baker@lancaster.ac.uk
@paulbaker
https://www.lancaster.ac.uk/linguistics/about/people/Paul-Baker

[long paper]

This image has an empty alt attribute; its file name is Screenshot-2020-06-03-at-15.17.47-1.png

Using CADS to uncover how right-wing extremists generate an alternative rape culture in online narratives ★

Kate Barber Cardiff University

barberk@cardiff.ac.uk
@katebarber2015

[long paper]

[paper removed at author’s request]

2 thoughts on “Extremist Discourse

  1. Sofia Rüdiger June 18, 2020 — 6:42 am

    Hi Kate,

    many thanks for your great talk!

    You mention explicitly searching for posts which contain the words ‘rape’ or ‘sexual violence’.
    Did you also come across material which does not reference those explicitly (e.g. via browsing through these websites) but which were still descriptions of these events? That might not be the case for the news narratives, but I’m thinking about the personal narratives which weren’t the focus of your talk.
    While working on PUA data, we come across descriptions of rape which do not explicitly mention ‘rape’ or ‘sexual violence’. Those would be pretty difficult to identify automatically, but I’m wondering whether it would still be worthwhile to delve deeper into those and see how rape is reframed as ‘last minute resistance’, etc.

    Last but not least, it’s hard to work on this kind of material but all the more important to persevere. Many thanks for doing this research!

    Like

    1. Cardiff University June 18, 2020 — 10:53 am

      Hi Sofia
      Thanks very much for your comments, questions, and encouragement. I really appreciate your support. Yes, the search terms were definitely problematic. I tried other ‘mainstream’ terms as well (e.g. violation, molestation, abuse) but, for a number of reasons, these terms brought up unrelated articles which didn’t fit into the research questions. It was very difficult at the beginning to work out which terms for rape/sexual assault would be used by the communities/readership; which metaphorical phrases might be used; and yes, the extent of terms like those related to ‘resistance’ so I decided to use the more legal reference to sexual violence as I wanted to see how it was reframed from more mainstream news. In the personal narratives, the act itself was often overlooked or referred to as ‘consensual sex’, with the focus being on the false allegation by a (then vilified) women.

      I’m currently working with the non-narrative discourses from the blogs and there are definitely some interesting data on the way sexual violence is introduced as a topic in the blog posts when the authors are not referring directly to a news report on it. Perhaps I’ll get a chance to present that another time 🙂

      Kate

      Like

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