Healthcare Interactions

Find further details of each talk in the Book of Abstracts here.

Those marked with are eligible for nomination to a student researcher award. Find the full list of awards here.

You are welcome to use the comment function at the bottom of the page to comment on papers you have seen and/or submit questions that you would like to see raised in the discussion panel. If replying to an individual paper, please specify who you are talking to.

Panel chaired by Gavin Brookes (@GavinBrookes26).

A comparative study of the discourse of Voice Output Communication Aids users’ with and without their aids in the workplace.

Julie Bouchard Université du Québec à Chicoutimi
Laura Di FerranteSapienza Università di Roma

@juliebouchard02
http://www.uqac.ca/portfolio/julie2bouchard/

laura.diferrante@uniroma1.it
@ladiferro

[long paper]

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Evaluation of medication safety oversight programs in the United States using corpus linguistics methods

Carmen Dayrell Lancaster University
Darren M. TrillerWellScriptEd Consulting
Youssef BessadaAlbany College of Pharmacy and Health Science
Elena Semino Lancaster University

c.dayrell@lancaster.ac.uk
@carmendayrell
https://www.lancaster.ac.uk/people-profiles/carmen-dayrell

dtriller@WellScriptEdConsulting.com

youssef.bessada@acphs.edu

e.semino@lancaster.ac.uk
@elenasemino
https://www.lancaster.ac.uk/linguistics/about/people/Elena-Semino

[long paper]

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Personalising stock responses: A corpus-based study of ‘mixed’ replies to patient feedback on the NHS Choices website ★

Craig Evans Lancaster University

[long paper]

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9 thoughts on “Healthcare Interactions

  1. Hi everyone! I’m really looking forward to the panel this afternoon. If you have any thoughts or questions about the papers, you can leave these as a comment here. Looking forward to seeing you all later!

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  2. Is the access to these videos temporary and will be removed when the conference ends?

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    1. jasminkidgell1 June 17, 2020 — 1:52 pm

      Hello! The videos will be available on the website for a minimum of one week.

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  3. Fascinating talk by Julie and Laura – understanding how the devices are used in authentic situations seems an essential part of their development. Do you have the opportunity to report back to the types of people who are responsible for designing and manufacturing them?

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  4. Fascinating talk Julie and Laura – understanding how the devices are used in authentic interactions seems key to how they are developed. Do you have the opportunity to report back to people who design and/or manufacture them?

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  5. Laura Di Ferrante June 17, 2020 — 2:39 pm

    Hi! I have a question for Craig Evans. Very interesting presentation! I also found the recap-self-promotion link particularly insightful. I was wondering how the themes were classified. Some of the categories seem to be susceptible of overlapping, for example well-wishing and speech acts. I have a similar problem with the classification of topics in workplace discourse, so I was wondering if you could offer more details on how the keywords were assigned to different themes. Thank you so much!

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    1. Hi. Thank you for your kind comment about my presentation. I must say, I thoroughly enjoyed your talk and think your research is both fascinating and important. About my keyword categories: My rationale for distinguishing ‘getting well’ from ‘speech acts’ was that I felt there were enough keywords representing convalescence that meant they merited their own category. Of course, you are right, the two categories could have been merged. However, I felt there was enough of a difference between meaning and function to justify separate categories despite the overlap. For example, the ‘speech act’ keywords represent speech acts in lexicalised form (e.g. congratulations) or indicate a speech act category (e.g. compliment), whereas the ‘getting well’ words tend to be representations of the idea of getting well, even though in practice they also happen to constitute a well-wishing speech act. The fact is that deciding thematic categories is a very qualitative process, and I suspect several researchers working with the same keywords would likely identify different themes. Hope this answers your question.

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      1. By the way, I should also say – in light of reading comments in other panels – that my inferences about the meaning and function of keywords when determining themes is, as a matter of routine, based on reviewing sample concordances, i.e. based on how the words are used in the corpus.

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      2. Laura Di Ferrante June 18, 2020 — 8:55 am

        Makes sense. Thank you so much!

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