Identity in Discourse

Find further details of each talk in the Book of Abstracts here.

Those marked with are eligible for nomination to a student researcher award. Find the full list of awards here.

You are welcome to use the comment function at the bottom of the page to comment on papers you have seen and/or submit questions that you would like to see raised in the discussion panel. If replying to an individual paper, please specify who you are talking to.

Panel chaired by Nick Groom (@Nicholasgroom).

A new corpus RusIdiolect as a tool to study a variety of discourses produced by the same person

Tatiana Litvinova Voronezh State Pedagogical University

centr_rus_yaz@mail.ru
en.rusprofilinglab.ru

[short paper]

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British and American English – A Reciprocal Influence

Franco Tondi University of Catania

franco.tondi@unict.it

[short paper]

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Gypsies and Travellers and the discourse of dirt and cleanliness

Roberta PiazzaUniversity of Sussex

[long paper]

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How to be an expert online? A corpus-based study of expert identity construction on a Spanish medical forum

Barbara De CockUniversité catholique de Louvain
Carolina Figueras BatesUniversitat de Barcelona

barbara.decock@uclouvain.be
@barbaradecock
http://www.uclouvain.be/barbara.decock

[long paper]

[paper removed at authors’ request]

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Interpersonal positioning in written academic ELF – different degrees of self-assurance

Monika ManakovaUniversity of Ostrava

[short paper]

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Personal and impersonal authorial references in research articles: Variation across four disciplines

Mohsen Khedri Sohar University, Oman

mkhedri@su.edu.om

[long paper]

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Styling a leader: Tracing pronoun clusters in the construction of persona ★

Esther Surenthiraraj University of Lausanne / University of Colombo

[long paper]

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The Polish Catholic Church on life of Poles. Corpus Assisted Critical Discourse Analysis

Victoria Kamasa Adam Mickiewicz University in Poznań

[long paper]

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The Role of Multilingualism Patterns and Functions on Branding and Self-Branding: An Investigation of Practices by Saudi Users on Twitter

Reem Al MadaniCardiff University

almadanir@cardiff.ac.uk
@ReemMadani

[long paper]

15 thoughts on “Identity in Discourse

  1. @Barbara & Carolina Thank you for sharing your interesting project.

    More of a comment than a question..: I have also studied online communities, not on medical issues, but containing peer-information sharing nonetheless. Expertise construction is certainly prevalent! I also have the impression that even in threads that start with a question, the replies by contain 1SG pronouns not only to share their own solutions and experiences, but to also share their own concerns: not quite a thread hijacking, but a way of sharing own practices slightly more tangentially to the original topic. In other words, the very goals are quite different from “pure” expertise giving. I see some parallels in your conclusion about the peers’ position in the group…

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    1. Thanks for your comment! It’s true that some replies may concern not only advise giving but also adding an own question or other topics and concerns. Could you share a reference to your work?

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      1. My work is from my ongoing PhD study, and unfortunately I don’t yet have anything out: an article manuscript where I look at pronouns in English online communities is only just being sent to a journal. However, I’d be interested to discuss the topic further or I can always share the article when it’s ready.

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    2. Carolina Figueras June 18, 2020 — 3:56 pm

      Thank you for your comment. Certainly, pronouns can be used for a wide range of strategic reasons. Maybe what you found is a way of performing another layer of identity in certain settings. Since identity is a very malleable construct, and pronouns are so versatile, it is possible to exploit the referential apparatus in quite efficient ways in communication.

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  2. Dear Roberta,

    Thanks for the interesting research.
    It might be the case that the discourse of referring to GRT as “dirty” has disappeared from the press but not from other discourses, e.g. informal conversations or social media, or from visual modes. The situation is not entirely comparable but in our paper (the one in the panel on verbal agression in political discourse, not the one in the identity panel), we found a relatively low amount of tweets with hatespeech in the production of well-known politicians, while we know it is much more present in some other discourses. So maybe the press discourse has changed quicker than some other discourses?

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    1. Roberta Piazza June 19, 2020 — 7:29 am

      Thanks so much Barbara. I will watch your presentation. I think the problem is, as i suggested, that ‘dirt’ is no longer newsworthy for the press.

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  3. Hi Roberta,

    Your research is absolutely fascinating and I can’t wait to hear more. I wondered if you had any thoughts on the methodological challenges of combining qualitative interviewing with analysis of media/social media discourse – specifically how you tie the two methods and various datasets together. It’s something I will be doing but I’m not totally sure how I will bring it all together yet so would be interested in your thoughts.

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    1. Roberta Piazza June 19, 2020 — 7:34 am

      Thanks a lot Tamsin. I want to add interviews and questionnaires with settled people to see if the notion of dirt comes up. I already have a number of interviews with Travellers who talk about ‘moral dirt’. I think the issue is not to elicit a discussion of ‘dirt’ directly but rather wait to see if dirt emerges in people’s contributions.This would be comparable to the press articles that address the topic of Gypsies and Travellers as a whole and do not talk about dirt in the specific.I hope this makes sense.

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  4. Roberta Piazza June 19, 2020 — 7:26 am

    Question for Barbara and Carolina. Thanks for a very interesting paper. Do you know about the impact of the two discourse strategies (in peer-expert and expert discourse groups) on patients? It’d be interesting to find out.

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    1. We didn’t look into it yet but it’s definitely on the to do list 😉 The success of both groups suggests at least that they both meet a need.

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  5. Georgia Fragaki June 19, 2020 — 8:58 am

    Dear Reem,
    Thanks for your presentation, which I found very interesting. I would like to know more about your findings concerning the other two categories (influencers and ordinary users) if you’ve made this analysis already.
    I was also wondering how easy is to distinguish between standard and colloquial Arabic. Do they differ linguistically in specific aspects (e.g. in terms of vocabulary, patterning, pronunciation etc), apart from the different contexts of situation in which they are used? Is the concept of diglossia still relevant to the study of Arabic?

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    1. Hi Georgia,

      Thank you for your comment.

      It is still work in progress with the influencers and ordinary users but I have already analysed some of the accounts and done the relevant interviews.
      Modern Standard Arabic and Colloquial Arabic differ in number of ways in terms of their lexical, syntactic, phonological, and morphological features. I relied on these differences in the coding process.
      Regarding diglossia, the original concept of High and Low in Arabic has been refined by different researchers to acknowledge the existence of varieties in the middle. Most researchers now refer to three main varieties, i.e. Classical Arabic, Modern Standard Arabic, and Colloquial Arabic. There are also further studies that acknowledge more in between varieties such as the spoken colloquial variety of the educated as presented by Badawi (1973). In this research project, I observed a variety that is between Modern Standard Arabic and Colloquial Arabic which somehow resembles the spoken colloquial of the educated but in a written form.

      I hope this answers your question.

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  6. Roberta, what important work, thank you! I wonder if any of your research into and among GRTs has crossed over into any research on Showfolk? Communities who make their livelihood from travelling with fairs etc are excluded from the cultural protections of GRTs in the UK (although regularly campaign for inclusion), but are subject to many of the same stigmatisations from settled communities. I’d be interested to hear if your research has uncovered any data regarding these communities?

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  7. A question for Barbara and Carolina: Thank you for your interesting presentation. You cited Stommel and Lamerichs 2014; I wonder if you also used Stommel’s 2009 book Entering an Online Support Group on Eating Disorders in your work. She noted that acceptance of the ‘sick’ role was required by participants with ED to gain acceptance to a group she studied, and that there was some negotiation of identity in a user’s initial post due to hesitancy in accepting the ‘sick’ role. Would you consider hedging a form of negotiation of the expert role in cases of peer advice?

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  8. Anastasia Novoselova June 19, 2020 — 1:11 pm

    @Barbara and @Carolina. I wanted to ask if you noticed in your data if linguistic devices signalling expertise in support forums are present in every interaction or do they disappear after an ‘expert’ gained a certain number of followers or ‘kudos points’? In other words, if expertise is established once or is it sustained over a number of interactions? Thank you.

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