Language, Gender & Sexuality

Find further details of each talk in the Book of Abstracts here.

Those marked with are eligible for nomination to a student researcher award. Find the full list of awards here.

You are welcome to use the comment function at the bottom of the page to comment on papers you have seen and/or submit questions that you would like to see raised in the discussion panel. If replying to an individual paper, please specify who you are talking to.

Panel chaired by Federica Formato (@genderedform).

A Corpus-based Study of Discursive Representation of LGBT Identities and Movement in the Bangkok Post ★

Duangkamol Chuaikun & Raksangob Wijitsopon Chulalongkorn University

[long paper]

[paper removed at authors’ request]

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A Study of the Concept of ‘Menopause’ in Thai society

Prapaipan Phingchim Chulongkorn University

[short paper]

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‘Black or gay or Jewish or whatever’: A diachronic corpus-based discourse analysis of how the UK’s LGBTQI population came to be represented as secular, cisgender, gay, white and male ★

Mark Wilkinson Lancaster University

m.wilkinson7@lancaster.ac.uk
@MarkJoseph_82

[long paper]

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Body Parts as Means of Enacting Agency in Transgender Fiction ★

Eloisa Lillywhite University of Sussex

E.Lillywhite@sussex.ac.uk

[short paper]

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Czech broadsheets discourse about female politicians in comparison with male politicians

Adrian ZasinaCharles University

adrian.zasina@ff.cuni.cz
https://ucnk.ff.cuni.cz/en/institute/people/adrian-jan-zasina-2/

[long paper]

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Looking or not looking for? A corpus-assisted analysis on discriminative and homonormative language used by British and Italian men having sex with men (MSM) in personal ads in “PlanetRomeo” dating app ★

Federico ZaupaUniversity of Modena and Reggio Emilia

federico.zaupa@unimore.it

[short paper]

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Same-sex marriage, gay marriage, or equal marriage? Exclusion or inclusion by premodification in a corpus of 21st century UK press reports

Laura L. Paterson The Open University
Mark McGlashan Birmingham City University

Mark.McGlashan@bcu.ac.uk
@Mark_McGlashan
http://www.MarkMcGlashan.org

[long paper]

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Synergies between Corpus Linguistics and Ludolinguistics: Using Corpora to Explore the Representation of Gender in Videogames.

Frazer Heritage Lancaster University

[long paper]

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Towards a Dictionary of Polish Political Discourse 2015-2019

Sonia Kropiowska European Master in Lexicography

sonia.kropiowska@gmail.com
@SKropiowska

[long paper]

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Transgressive Pleasures: Identity and desire in the discursive construction of gender-nonconforming characters in porn

Alon Lishinsky Oxford Brookes University
Kat Gupta – University of Roehampton

alon@lischinsky.net
@alischinsky

kat@mixosaurus.co.uk
@mixosaurus

[long paper]

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What’s love got to do with it? Gender accommodation versus flirting in teenagers’ online conversations

Lisa Hilte, Reinhild Vandekerckhove & Walter Daelemans –
CLiPS research center / University of Antwerp

Lisa.Hilte@uantwerpen.be
https://www.uantwerpen.be/nl/personeel/lisa-hilte

Reinhild.Vandekerckhove@uantwerpen.be
https://www.uantwerpen.be/nl/personeel/reinhild-vandekerckhove

[short paper]

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“You can tell he’s a baddy just by looking at him!” Appearance and identity in children’s literature

Sally HuntUniversity of Reading

[long paper]

20 thoughts on “Language, Gender & Sexuality

  1. Eloisa Lillywhite June 18, 2020 — 7:55 pm

    A fascinating paper by Duangkamol Chuaikun, thank you! Is this published, or due to be published? I would love to read the whole paper. Did you code variations of your keywords, such as trans, trans+, trans*, bi, etc?
    Also, are non-binary people talked about in their own ‘category’ in Thai press, or are they under the umbrella term of LGBT?

    Like

    1. Duangkamol Chuaikun June 19, 2020 — 10:32 am

      Hi Eloisa. Thank you for your comment 🙂

      Regarding my research publication, I haven’t sent it to any journals, but I’ve planned to.

      For the second question, I only added * to the search terms such as lesbian*,gay* and so on in AntConc. Actually, I did search for ‘transsexual’, ‘LGBTQ’ and ‘queer’ in the Bangkok Post website, but only two or three articles of each term were found, so I didn’t include them in my study.

      For the third question, I would say that non-binary people are mentioned both separately from and inclusively with other LGBTQ groups (depending on the issues) in Thai press.

      I’m glad to hear that you enjoyed my presentation.
      Thank you so much.

      Like

  2. Victoria Kamasa June 19, 2020 — 8:19 am

    Dear Sally! Thank you for your presentation. I enjoyed it a lot (especially parts about HP as I’m a fan). I love your category of size and shape. Have you also looked in collocations for names of main characters? It would be really interesting to see collocation for combined list of main mail of female characters (like Harry, Ron, Malfoy etc.).

    Like

    1. Eloisa Lillywhite June 19, 2020 — 9:37 am

      If you enjoyed this presentation of Sally’s, you might want to have a look at her ‘Representations of Gender and Agency in the Harry Potter Series’ paper. She talks more about the difference in language associated with the main male versus female characters in that one.

      In book: Corpora and Discourse Studies: Integrating Discourse and Corpora (pp.266-284)Publisher: PalgraveEditors: Baker, Paul and McEnery, Tony

      Like

      1. for Harry Potter fans, Gill Philip (2013 – I think) also has done some interesting work on it

        Like

  3. Charlotte Kennedy June 19, 2020 — 8:42 am

    Absolutely fascinating paper by Mark Wilson, I really enjoyed it! I wondered, how did you arrive at your search terms? Thank you!

    Like

    1. Hi Charlotte!
      Thanks so much for your question!

      Arriving at a list of search terms took quite a while actually. I had to consider historically contingent language (e.g. a term such as non-binary wasn’t used in the earlier corpora), as well as semantic variation across time (e.g. terms like gay and bisexual meant something different in the 50s/60s).
      I started with my own intuitions and historical research in order to figure out what terms would be in use during each time period. I then expanded this list by using the OED historical thesaurus. This provided 100s of terms. Finally I did searches of each of these in The Times Digital Archive to see if they were in common use in The Times. This eventually provided much smaller and manageable lists.

      I’m glad you enjoyed it!

      Like

  4. Sally, thanks for such a clear and accessible presentation! Good for ‘impact’ – I have shared it with non-linguist non-academic family members who are thinking about buying books for their young children 🙂

    Like

  5. Hi Lisa Hilte, Nice presentation about Gender accommodation versus flirting in teenagers’ online conversations. Your corpus data is very big. That is great! I am wondering if you give me info how to collect that data and how you decide between male and female number of participants in collecting your data. Many thanks.

    Like

    1. Hi Cipto,

      Happy to hear that you liked our presentation! For the data collection, we visited many secondary schools. After informing the pupils about our research, we invited them to voluntarily donate parts of their chat history (anything produced before our school visits was allowed). Of course, we anonymized all of these submissions, and the students’ and their parents’ permission was asked to store and analyze their anonymized data. Finally, the participants themselves provided the metadata and indicated e.g. their gender, age, educational track, …

      Hope this helps!

      Best wishes from Belgium,

      Lisa

      Like

  6. Veronika Koller June 19, 2020 — 10:15 am

    Great study – as usual! – by Gupta & Lischinsky. I really liked the idea of porn featuring gender non-conformative actors being behind, with and ahead of the times simultaneously. Their work on a 26-million-word corpus complements a couple of studies I did on a similar topic, but individual stories:

    Koller, V. (2015). The subversive potential of queer pornography: A systemic-functional analysis of a written online text. Journal of Language and Sexuality, 4(2): 254–271.

    Koller, V. (2014). No ordinary boy: Language, masculinities and queer pornography. In: Milani, T. (ed.) Language and Masculinities: Performances, intersections, dislocations. London: Routledge, pp. 156-173. [Kat, we met when I presented this one at a BAAL SIG meeting – you were the only person in the audience who didn’t look away with embarrassment but positively beamed at me. x]

    Like

  7. Hi, Adrian Zasina…Your presentation on Czech male and female politician discourse is interesting. You conclude both men and women presented in positive way. This fact is very interesting, similar to what you said that female politics were described as strong and powerful. I was wondering if the number (percentage) of male and female politicians was same in Czech?
    in my country women do not interested becoming politician, of course this phenomena is different in each country.

    Like

    1. Hello,
      thank you. The number of women in the lower and higher house of parliament has grown during past 14 years in the Czech Republic. Now, it makes around 20 %. Definitely women are more and more willing to entrance the political career. However, in the Czech context some women do not feel the need to join politics because they are convinced that a male politician can take care of their needs. I hope that my findings confirming a positive view of female politician in the Czech discourse will encourage women to choose a political career more often.

      Like

  8. Veronika Koller June 19, 2020 — 10:39 am

    Fascinating paper by Mark Wilkinson – and the slides were very stylish, too!

    Like

    1. Mark Wilkinson June 19, 2020 — 1:28 pm

      Thanks Veronica! I’ve passed on your compliments to the artiste as well and he thinks you have very good taste 😉

      Like

  9. A general question for those of you who studied fiction – Sally, Frazer and Eloisa. You all seem to have used data representing the most popular works in a given time period. What guided your decision in choosing by popularity and do you see there being any drawbacks or limitations related to this? I was thinking that “progressiveness” might not be as prevalent in the “mainstream”…

    (I posted this question in the panel, too, and Sally already replied (thanks! :)) but feel free to continue.)

    Like

  10. Federica Formato June 19, 2020 — 12:22 pm

    Hi all,
    I really enjoyed watching all your videos! I look forward to read papers and use them to inform my teaching!

    I have some questions (that I could not ask in the panel because of time).

    For Adrian: is the male form – politic – used also as a generic, that is also referring to women? If so, have you taken this into consideration when coding your results? I have looked at adjectives found “next to” two forms – Ministro.MASC and Ministra.FEM. considering the first as a generic (that is used for female ministers).

    For Frazer: are the female characters protagonists of the games or side-figures? And how does the use of he + violence can be seen in relation to the notion of masculinity/ies?

    Like

    1. Dear Federica,

      I took it into account choosing the material for my analysis. Therefore I decided to analyse only singular forms of “politik” and “politička” which do not have a generic meaning such us masculine plural form “politici”. In differentiating male and female forms the Czech language is quite special because we predominantly find forms for both sexes. However, there are case where you can find a masculine singular form in generic meaning (e.g. job offers).

      Like

    2. I took it into account choosing the material for my analysis. Therefore I decided to analyse only singular forms of “politik” and “politička” which do not have a generic meaning such us masculine plural form “politici”. In differentiating male and female forms the Czech language is quite special because we predominantly find forms for both sexes. However, there are case where you can find a masculine singular form in generic meaning (e.g. job offers).

      Like

    3. Frazer Heritage June 25, 2020 — 9:42 am

      Hi Frederica,
      sorry I’ve only just seen this when coming back to re-listen to a section from another video!

      It certainly varies from game to game with how prominent the characters are – for example, the main playable character in Bayonetta is a woman – and there are some side characters that are women throughout different games too (such as The Witcher).

      I certainly think that the idea of he + violence links to masculinity – specifically Connell’s idea of physical masculinity – something I found in additional was that men were typically seen as ‘good’ if they were able to preform physical masculinity and seen as burdens if they couldn’t!

      Thanks for a great question! 🙂

      Like

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